SPORTS

Monthly Archives: MARCH 2016


Is this end of the road for Yuvraj Singh?
30.03.16 - Chinmay Jawalekar*
Is this end of the road for Yuvraj Singh?



There was a time when Yuvraj Singh's walk to the crease would send shivers down the spine in opposition ranks. His uninhibited striking, confident swagger and golden arm had made him India’s Talisman in the limited-overs.
 
Almost exactly a couple of years ago, India suffered heartbreak as they were comprehensively beaten by neighbours Sri Lanka in a World Cup final. The tournament was the ICC World T20 2014 and till that game, Team India had not put a foot wrong in their run to the final. They were easily the team to beat, and were rightly dubbed as the title favourites by the cricket pundits. The final too had been going well for them till the first half of their innings, with their best batsman Virat Kohli playing like a dream. But things changed in the eleventh over with the fall of Rohit Sharma’s wicket, when Yuvraj Singh came out to bat. Little did he know that Lasith Malinga already had a blueprint ready for him.
 
There was a time when Yuvraj’s walk to the crease would send shivers down the spine in opposition ranks. His uninhibited striking, his confident swagger and his golden arm had made him Team India’s talisman in the limited-overs. But that was a thing of the past as he took guard in that final against Sri Lanka. He entered the field in the 11th over and by the time he was dismissed in the 19th, and all he could manage was a scratchy 21-ball 11. Malinga kept bowling him yorkers outside off which he failed to deal with, even as a hapless Kohli looked from the other end. He struggled to put bat to the ball and in the process, deprived Kohli of strike, whose batting was poetry in motion that evening. 
 
As a result, India put a modest 130 on the board, the lowest first-innings total in a World T20 final, which was never going to be enough to test Sri Lanka. India lost the match and Yuvraj was crucified by the media and fans alike. On the expected lines, he was dropped from the team, not for the first time though in his almost a decade-and-a-half career. Critics wrote him off and predictions were made that he may perhaps never play for India again. For a man who had seen it all, being diagnosed with a cancerous tumor and making a stunning comeback beating all odds, a comeback was never going to be an insurmountable task.
 
He did make one; a surprising, or rather shocking one, in December last year when he was picked for the Australia tour. Yes, he had made runs in the domestic circuit and averaged around 85 in the Vijay Hazare Trophy, but the decision was intriguing for he was recalled in a format that marked his embarrassing axing from the side and not for the ODIs, where he was doing well. Since then, till India’s last league match in the World T20 2016, though he did not exactly set the stage on fire, he did enough as a team-man to influence team India’s fortunes. All this while, his big sixes, swagger, confidence and attitude were all missing, which triggered calls for his ouster by a section of media.
 
And now, with a mistimed ankle injury ending his World T20 campaign painfully just ahead of the knockouts, the talks about his career coming to an end will only gain momentum and this time, there is a rationale to it. India’s calendar is Test-heavy for next 18 months, where they play around 17 Tests. There will be some ODIs too, where Yuvraj is not in the mix. The only format where he fits into the scheme of things is T20, one that does not find a prominent place in India’s schedule. Moreover, the emergence of Manish Pandey, the player who has replaced him in the World T20 squad, only makes life difficult for him. Then there is Ajinkya Rahane, waiting for his chances in the limited-overs sides, and Shreyas Iyer, threatening to break open the door.

But it is not only about the external forces that will impact his return to the field; Yuvraj has to battle the internal demons all over again. It will be a test of his character, his attitude, his willingness and hunger to return back to the field once again and of course his fitness. His body, one that has survived the rigours of international cricket for 16 long years and conquered a disease most succumb to, is not at its best. His reflexes are not as good as they used to be when he thrashed a young Stuart Broad for 6 sixes. At 34, he is not the same Yuvraj who took on Glenn McGrath and  in his maiden international outing with flair. If he is to make a comeback again, he will have to pass all these tests, or else, this may well be the end of the road for him.
Courtesy : *cricketcountry.com 
 




[home] [1] 2 3  [next]1-5 of 14


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



National level Volleyball player beaten to death by stalker in front of teammates
26.03.16 - pt team
National level Volleyball player beaten to death by stalker in front of teammates



A national-level volleyball player was beaten to death in front of her teammates at Notunpukur, on the outskirts of Kolkata on Friday.
 
Sangita Aich (14), represented India at the U-14 level twice, and was a stalwart of Bengal junior setup. According to police reports, she was allegedly murdered by her stalker Subrata Sinha (20), for thwarting his advances on several occasions.
 
According to a report in Sportskeeda, Sinha reached Sangita’s training camp early on Friday, demanding to meet her. Upon refusal, he approached her with a cleaver and slashed her multiple times. Sangita’s teammates tried to stop Sinha, by hitting him with a chair, but the beating was to no avail. A petrified Sangita ran towards her home, located 200m away from the camp. However, Sinha caught up and bludgeoned her to death.
 
Bengal junior Coach, Swapan Das told Sportskeeda, "He came out of nowhere, I asked him to leave, but he brought his cleaver out and starting hitting Tina (Sangita), I ran to her aid and hit him with a chair, but he was in a fit of rage. He chased her down and slashed her multiple times before running away.
 
A resident of Shyamnagar, Sangita’s parents revealed that Sinha had threatened her on multiple occasions. He had even called their house several times.
 
The Police have begun their search, but are yet to find the alleged perpetrator. Sangita’s parents were in no condition to comment on the matter.




[home] [1] 2 3  [next]1-5 of 14


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



Rio will be my last Olympics: Bolt
26.03.16 - pt team
Rio will be my last Olympics: Bolt



Sprinter Usain Bolt has confirmed he will retire after this year’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro despite calls to prolong his career.

The six-time Olympic gold medalist suggested in January that he could continue competing until the 2020 Games in Tokyo on the advice of his coach Glen Mills, Xinhua reported.

But the Jamaican Sprinter said success in Rio would leave him with little reason to continue at the elite level.

"It will definitely be my last Olympics,” the 29- year-old said, adding, "It is going to be hard to go four more years for me, to keep the motivation that I want, especially if I accomplish what I want to in Rio.

"It is going to be hard to keep the motivation going for four more years so it will definitely be my last one.”

Bolt won gold in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay at the London 2012 Games in a repeat of his performances in Beijing four years earlier.

He is determined to extend his dominance in his three favorite events this August, with an extra focus on the 200m.

"My biggest dream at the Olympics is to win three gold medals again, that is my focus and it is what I want. That is my goal and that is my dream,” he said.

Despite holding the world record of 19.19 seconds for the 200m Bolt believes he has unfinished business in the event.

"I have said the only big thing, big time I want to run is the 200 metres,” he said.

"I would love to try to go sub-19. that is the only thing I would really want because that is one of my goals and it is is something I look forward to.”




[home] [1] 2 3  [next]1-5 of 14


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



Pakistan gear up for the big match, Kohli presents Amir with a cricket bat
19.03.16 - pt team
Pakistan gear up for the big match, Kohli presents Amir with a cricket bat



Pakistan cricket team arrived at The Eden Gardens in Kolkata on Friday to train ahead of their World T20 match against India. During the session, Indian batsman Virat Kohli presented Mohammad Amir with a cricket bat.
"I had asked him for a bat during the Asia Cup and Virat said he would give me one in India,” Amir was quoted as saying by Wisden India.

"I am glad he remembered that. He has fantastic bats, and I am confident I will be able to contribute with the bat too in time to come for Pakistan.”




[home] [1] 2 3  [next]1-5 of 14


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



1999: When Pakistan and India went to war, on and off the field
19.03.16 - AHSAN IFTIKHAR NAGI
1999: When Pakistan and India went to war, on and off the field



It is a widely affirmed notion that sports and politics must not be mixed.

However, when it comes to India and Pakistan, it's hard to pry away one from the other. It is usually all or nothing. Culture, traditions, politics, economics, science and history all come with the package.

In fact, it is the relations of the two neighbors that determine their cricketing itinerary, like in the case of the upcoming World Twenty20 group match.

The highly-anticipated World T20 contest became a pawn of internal Indian politics as Siddharth Monga rightly put it.

To fan anti-Pakistan sentiments and score some points for the Indian National Congress party, the Chief Minister of Himachal Pradesh, Virbhadra Singh, refused to grant security to Shahid Afridi's team in Dharamsala, where the World T20 match was originally scheduled to take place.

The match was eventually shifted to Kolkata, and Singh has since claimed 'he never refused to provide security to Pakistan'.

The clouds of uncertainty over the fixture settled when India publically assured Pakistan of 'foolproof' security for the match at Eden Gardens on March 19.

The threats to the Pakistan team from right-wing activists, Singh's remarks, and Rohit Sharma’s harebrained statement about Amir promise an encounter which would put the nastiest of pre-Ashes fixtures in the shade.

But if cricket fans think the developments of the past few weeks have been interesting, imagine what it would have been like in 1999, when the Asian-giants took on each other in Manchester at the 1999 World Cup. The contest led to three arrests, nine ejections, and one burnt Indian flag in the crowd: something extraordinary for the cricket audience.

Pakistan and India met in the Super Sixes of the World Cup with their armies engaged in a conflict in Kargil in the disputed-Kashmir region. This was probably first time that the two countries played against each other on a sports field when they were engaged in conflict.

With their armies exchanging gunfire amid the towering peaks, India opted to bat first.

Wasim Akram ensured Mohammad Azharuddin's side were not off to a flier and Pakistan dominated the early passage of play.

Sachin Tendulkar was firm as always, and scored an invaluable 45 runs. Rahul Dravid and Azharuddin – made crucial contributions in the middle-order as both crossed the 50-runs mark and set Pakistan a target of 228.

People in India and Pakistan switched between the footage of the conflict on the television and the match in Manchester; it couldn't have been tenser.

In reply, Saeed Anwar was the only bright spot of the Pakistan innings as Shahid Afridi, Ijaz Ahmed, and Saleem Malik fell in quick succession leaving the side in tatters.

Pakistan's batsmen were as confused in the shot-selection as the nation was over what was happening in Kargil.

Pakistan were wrapped up for just 180 with 27 balls to spare and India completed their third consecutive World Cup win over Pakistan, all under the same captain.

The irony of Pakistan and India fighting a war in Kashmir when their cricket teams battled it out in England was a little bit too much. Many in India and Pakistan believe Kashmir was a parting gift by English over which Pakistan and India would fight for generations.

Despite the charge up environment, though, the cricket contest was not strangled and 1999 served as another example that sport and politics can in fact be separated. (*Dawn)




[home] [1] 2 3  [next]1-5 of 14


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 







MOST VISITED
YOU MAY LIKE

TOPIC CLOUD

TAGS CLOUD

ARCHIVE



Copyright © 2016-2017







NEWS LETTER