ENTERTAINMENT

Monthly Archives: JUNE 2016


Even if Udta Punjab is fiction...
25.06.16 - AMANDEEP SANDHU
Even if Udta Punjab is fiction...



…it is based on a social reality. Knowing how hard it is for filmmakers to fight piracy and recover costs, a week after the release of the film is a good time to look at what it gets right and what it does not

Throughout the 149 minutes, the actors get the acting and the script gets the psychology of Punjab: the bravado and false pride when facing an abyss — Tommy’s conversation in the car with his investor; the denial — Sartaj refusing to accept his brother Balli is an addict; the pecking order in the corrupt police and in society — Pehalwan’s truck; the violence both verbal and physical — the cuss words, songs and beatings; the surface kindness and deep malice — abuse of the migrant girl; the territoriality — of drugs, of fans, over the girl; the hint at the condition of migrant labour — a first in any representation of Punjab.

The scene that makes for deeper reading is the beginning of the last sequence at the outhouse in Sultanpur. Police inspector Jujhar Singh (Manav Vij) is sitting on the chair. In front of him, on the ground, is sitting a bloodied Daljit Dosanjh, his junior Sartaj. Jujhar asks, "Why did you even have my name on the file? We grew up together showing our p**** to each other. I got you your job. Helped you keep it.” The file is the one Sartaj has prepared to give to the Election Commission. It lists the names of the politicians, suppliers, and police officers who are involved in the drug business. Sartaj responds, "It has my name too.” Jujhar asks, "But why?” Sartaj says, "Neither for you, nor for me but for Punjab.” Jujhar flings the hot tea he is holding at Sartaj’s face. Within the next few minutes, Sartaj shoots Jujhar.

Given their masculine childhood rituals, the support in personal and professional life, the bond between Sartaj and Jujhar, their relationship is of brothers. The question the scene raises is: What is Punjab? Is Punjab a land? Is Punjab a bond? Is Punjab a vision for which Sartaj is willing to let go of his brother, even implicate himself? Punjab’s history goes back more than 3,000 years. In this period it has seen countless kings. It has fought many battles alone. It has formed and seen tribal societies, monarchies, empires, colonial masters, and now democracy. If Punjab is a value, a shared sense of culture and future, the value has changed depending on the ruler’s whims and fancies. Punjab’s sense of trust — the glue that helps create and hold societies and systems — has been, and is, the biggest casualty amidst these immense battles and churning. What then is the value system of Punjab?

Where does a Punjabi place his or her loyalty? The norm in Punjab is to place it in the immediate family, often at the cost of the larger society. Now drugs are no longer an abstraction, the deep rupture has entered homes. The vestibule of trust is broken. That is why, by betraying the senior policeman, in favour of a dream for a better Punjab, Sartaj breaks an unwritten rule. The film tells us: if we want to see Punjab rise from its hallucinatory stupor, this fratricide is now essential.

However, what is worrisome is what the film does to the real war on drugs that doctors, healthcare workers, addicts and families are fighting on the ground. One of the biggest weapons in this fight is an Oral Substitution Therapy (OST) drug called Buprenorphine. Punjab’s anti-drug champions are fighting a hard battle with the government over this regulated drug. Current rules are that staff in de-addiction centres has to administer it personally to recovering addicts. When administered under prescription, Buprenorphine creates a withdrawal from heroin and itself does not lead to a progressive addiction.

Many a time, users and staff have complained how in between a de-addiction cycle the government cuts off the supply of the drug. It reaches the black market, where — in a complete twist to its original function — it sells as an alternative to heroin.

The doctor informs Sartaj that fake drug manufacturers are mixing this drug with another regulated drug called Phenylephrine to create a deadly concoction for consumption. This unduly stigmatises the good drug. The practical flip side is that henceforth when doctors prescribe Buprenorphine to addicts as an OST, the patients would be wary of it. The scriptwriters could have used any other chemical name, like they did with Phenylephrine, which is a placebo. I checked with psychiatrists in the State who told me that no doubt the pharmaceutical industry produces concoctions, but they have never seen a concoction like Chaand, which uses Buprenorphine.

A film which proclaims to be in favour of the war on drugs ends up not only demonising the good drug but also solving the issue of the drug network too simplistically. The sleuth mission, the rescue mission, the gunfights, the haunting romance of ‘ik kudi’ all seem nice in a film. However, the movie shows a very simplistic underside of Punjab as a drug-afflicted society where the war on drugs is stuck. One aspect is the blatant misuse of the Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act by the police and administration. There are others. Sadly, in spite of the filmmakers’ best intentions, it is because of representations like these that Punjab continues to stand alone in its adversities.

Amandeep Sandhu, author of Roll of Honour, is currently writing a book on Punjab
 
(Courtesy : Thehindubusinessline.com)




[home] 1-3 of 3


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



Women’s panel demands apology from Salman Khan for ‘raped woman’ comment
21.06.16 -
Women’s panel demands apology from Salman Khan for ‘raped woman’ comment



Bollywood superstar Salman Khan has landed himself in yet another controversy. The National Commission for Women (NCW) has demanded apology within seven days from Salman Khan who said he felt "like a raped woman” during his upcoming film Sultan’s rigorous shooting schedule, reports said on Tuesday.

Khan reportedly made the comments in an interview to promote his latest movie Sultan, which tells the story of an ageing wrestler trying to make a comeback.
Salman, 50, had to undergo rigorous training for the wrestling drama.
In his interview to online entertainment portal Spotboye, Salman Khan was talking about his hectic shooting schedule for his upcoming movie Sultan and while explaining how grueling the shoot was, he let slip this bombshell: "While shooting, during those six hours, there’d be so much of lifting and thrusting on the ground involved. That was tough for me because if I was lifting, I’d have to lift the same 120-kilo guy 10 times form 10 different angles. And likewise, get thrown that many times on the ground. This act is not repeated that many times in the real fights in the ring. When I used to walk out of the ring, after the shoot, I used to feel like a raped woman. I couldn’t walk straight. I would eat and then, head right back to training. That couldn’t stop.”

However, the actor’s manager said that he has been misquoted.

"Considering the number of female fans he has, he shouldn’t have made such a statement. Salman Khan should apologize,” NCW chief Lalitha Kumaramangalam told news channel CNN IBN on Tuesday. The NCW has sought an apology within seven days, NDTV reported.

Shaina NC, a spokesperson for the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in Maharashtra, tweeted: "Rape is an exercise of power to destruct a woman’s self esteem, (from what) I (know) of @BeingSalmanKhan he respects #women so he must apologise.”

Salman Khan’s father apologised for the actor’s ‘rape’ remark on twitter. He said "what he said was wrong, but his intention was not.”

In the same interview published on Monday, Khan said he had been able to quit every "vice” except women, saying that he had given up cigarettes, coffee and alcohol but not female company.




[home] 1-3 of 3


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



Kairana & Nirbhay Yatra Depicted In 'SHORGUL'? Sangeet Som Threatened?
20.06.16 - TEAM PT
Kairana & Nirbhay Yatra Depicted In 'SHORGUL'? Sangeet Som Threatened?



It's interesting to see how Jimmy Shergill-Ashutosh Rana starrer Shorgul that releases in theaters on 24th of June is turning out to be quite the Nostradamus of political dramas with a new twist of real time national news finding its reference in the film.
 
Recently a scene from the film emerged online that shows Narendra Jha  (who’s on-screen character, Alam Khan is speculated to be inspired by political leader Azam Khan), delivering a hefty speech directly relating to the Kairana issue at a political gathering. While in real life Kairana faces a law and order issue, it is getting a communal colouring through religious connotations being attached to it. Its uncanny as to how a film shot probably a year back, has one of its characters in the film (Narendra Jha) making a direct reference to Kairana. Watch it here -


Since the release of the film’s trailer, there has been mayhem on how the role essayed by Jimmy Shergeill (Ranjit Om in the film)  has a striking resemblance to political leader Sangeet Som, who has been connected to the Muzzafarnagar riots in the past. Getting a bit jittery, Sangeet Som had instructed a ban on Shorgul with a PIL being filed against the makers for negative portrayal of his character by Jimmy Shergeill.  While one one hand, Jimmy has consistently denied his character to be a biopic depiction, more similarities between the reel life and real life seem to be emerging with new scenes from the film put out.

 
With Sangeet Som announcing Nirbhay Yatra March into the Kairana district even after Hukkum Singh requesting him not to, Kairana threatens to remind us of Muzzafarnagar Riots and Shorgul will expose it all on the big screen. Watch  how Jimmy’s character in the film insists on going to the affected areas, while the administration tries to stop him in the similar manner as Sangeet Soam -


A 24 FPS Films Production, Shorgul has been on the radar of various political parties and on the hitlist of the Censor Board with the film already touching upon issues like Muzzafarnagar Riots, Babri Masjid and Godhra riots and now Kairana. The Censor Board had also requested the makers to mute the words Godhra and Gau Ganga from the film which was complied with. Interestingly most of the scenes in the film have been shot during real time political rallies and proceedings and there were instances when the makers were threatened by various social groups thinking that they were instigating riots in the city without realizing a film was being shot.
 
Swatantra Vijay Singh, Producer, Shorgul, states, "We had done an extensive research on the past communal incidents of our country before going to shoot for Shorgul and will be the first film that dares to highlight the Political manipulation of our religious sentiments. What’s happening in Kairana is really sad, but we all know that this is not for the first time. Kairana has been suffering from a poor state of law and order but vested interests of politicians have been using it to create communal disharmony. Yes our film definitely touches upon various controversial political controversies but it is no way a biopic but more like a need of the hour. We don't wish to defame any political party but we definitely want to highlight various subjects and ensure that audiences go back home with questions and a possible resolve towards a more logical India."




[home] 1-3 of 3


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 







MOST VISITED
YOU MAY LIKE

TOPIC CLOUD

TAGS CLOUD

ARCHIVE



Copyright © 2016-2017







NEWS LETTER