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Tag Archives: sikh

Do not worry, Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi. Aisi Koyee Ghatna Huyee Hee Nahi, Kotha Sahib Theek Thaak Hai
07.04.17 - kanwar manjit singh

ALWAR LYNCHING: AN OPEN LETTER TO INDIA’S MINORITIES AFFAIRS MINISTER 
 
Mr Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi,
 
IN ANY different circumstances, I would have addressed you as 'honourable' minister, but you just made some effort to lose that epithet. You actually stood up in Parliament and said that the Alwar lynching of Muslims did not happen? None of your party leaders, including ministers, took that line. It is not that they wanted a more credible person to say such a thing. They, my dear, wanted a ranking member of the tribe of people who impersonate as saviours of minorities to say something utterly inane. And you made the cut. Congratulations.

We in Punjab have known this tribe. In 1984, when the Indian Army tanks came trundling into the Golden Temple complex and Akal Takht, the supreme temporal seat of the Sikhs, was reduced to ruins, we had a top cleric, the then head priest of Golden ...
  


Sabhe Ghat Ram Bole: Fanaticism, Not Atheism, Is Irreligious
30.03.17 - by harcharan bains

Fanaticism and Superstition are the biggest enemies of Religion: In fact, these are Irreligious attitudes
 
The biggest enemy of religion is not atheism but fanaticism. Or, better still, fanaticism and superstition. Both have truly disfigured the face of religion and de-humanised its spirit.
 
And fanaticism and superstition have been marketed in the name of religion to exploit innocent masses. Both fanaticism and superstition are in fact the antithesis - the very opposite - of religion. Both have been used and exploited to the hilt by commercial opportunists posing as clergy or moral police.
 
What passes for religion in common language is just the opposite of religion. Those who hate religion must learn to distinguish it from communalism on the one hand and from dark superstition on the other.
 
What is communal is fundamentally irreligious. Religion sees one-ness in all Nature. Therefore, religion unites, and it unites not only man with man, but also man ...
  


The Sikhs. Who the hell are they? And why do they wear the turban?
15.09.16 - preet k s bedi

Nanak was born to a Hindu family in 1469. Had there been application forms to fill chances are he would have referred to himself as Hindu. His successors and followers would probably have called themselves Nanakpanthis. There is general agreement that Sikhism remained a group within the Hindu fold for over half a century after Nanak before assuming an independent identity from the time of Guru Arjan Dev, the fifth guru.  
 
Nanak was a fakir in the true sense. From the age of 30 he spent almost 25 years travelling intermittently in four or five long trips or udaasis to Tibet in the North, Bangladesh and Assam in the East, Sri Lanka in the South and Mecca and Iraq in the west. Evidence of his travels to Mecca where he may have gone as a Haji is weak but there is little doubt that he was a widely travelled man. ...
  


Communities and nations are formed by symbols.
25.02.16 - Amandeep Sandhu

I am sure the bhaktas and the BJP will maintain a long silence over this, but that is exactly why problems in Punjab fester and blow out of proportion: why was the Sikh regiment not part of the Republic Day parade?
 
The Punjab CM Badal, whose party SAD is based on panthic issues and seeks to represent Sikh causes has now written to the PM calling it 'sad and regrettable'. The Congress has jumped into the fray calling it a 'grave omission'. The Sikhs are upset and as happens with issues related to Sikhs the grievance is pouring in from UK and the Diaspora. The reason alleged is that the French premier was the chief guest and Sikhs in France have been contesting French laws which disallow turbans in schools. India did not want to displease the French.
 
The BJP is in partnership with the SAD in Punjab and their marriage is ...
  



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